Domain Name

A domain name is part of a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which is the address of a site or document on the Internet. In general, a domain name is comprised of a second-level domain, a “dot,” and a top-level domain (TLD). The wording to the left of the “dot” is the second-level domain, and the wording to the right of the “dot” is the TLD.

Example: If the domain name is “XYZ.COM,” the term “XYZ” is a second-level domain and the term “COM” is a TLD.

A domain name is usually preceded in a URL by “http://www.” The “http://” refers to the protocol used to transfer information, and the “www” refers to World Wide Web, a graphical hypermedia interface for viewing and exchanging information. There are two types of TLDs: generic and country code.

Domain Name After-market

The domain name after-market is the secondary market for Internet domain names. Here, a party interested in acquiring a domain name that is already registered bids or negotiates a price to effect the transfer of registration from the registered holder of the domain name.

The professional pursuit of speculation in the domain aftermarket is known as domaining.

The domain after-market is serviced by auction houses which provide communication methods for buyers and sellers to interact, often anonymously, to negotiate and complete a transaction. Auction houses often provide additional services, such as escrow.

Domain Name Backorder

A domain name backorder refers to a service that works to register a currently-registered domain name on your behalf as soon as it becomes available for hand registration.

Many auction houses and domain name registrars provide this type of service, and it is sometimes free – you only pay when the actual registration takes place. There may be a success fee, such as $60, if the service you are using is first to grab the domain name. Be sure to read the details of the backorder service that you plan to use.

Domain Name Hack

Domain name hacks (also referred to as domain hacks) are domain names that use the TLD to complete the word or phrase of the domain name.

One of the most famous domain name hacks was del.icio.us, which later determined that domain name hacks are often times difficult for customers to remember so they bought delicious.com.

In this context, the hack represents a trick (as in programming), not an exploit or break-in (as in security).

Some domain name hacks that were for sale in October, 2013 on DNX.com include:

  • Cruis.es
  • Puzzl.es
  • Priz.es
  • Hous.es
  • Websit.es
  • Sunglass.es
  • Properti.es
  • Hom.es
  • Colleg.es
  • Cours.es
  • InsuranceQuot.es
  • Updat.es
  • Archiv.es

Domain Name Resolvers

Scattered across the Internet are thousands of computers – called “Domain Name Resolvers” or just plain “resolvers” – that routinely cache the information they receive from queries to the root servers. These resolvers are located strategically with Internet Service Providers (ISPs) or institutional networks. They are used to respond to a user’s request to resolve a domain name – that is, to find the corresponding IP address.

Whois

WHOIS (pronounced as the phrase “who is”) is a query and response protocol that is widely used for querying databases that store the registered users or assignees of an Internet resource, such as a domain name, an IP address block or an autonomous system, but is also used for a wider range of other information. The protocol stores and delivers database content in a human-readable format.